Atomic Energy Commission of Syria

 
   

  Nuclear

 

Thu 22 Dec 2016. New technique for measuring radiation damage on the fly, thus continuously assess aging of materials in a high-radiation environment, such as nuclear reactor vessel, in real-time. The analytical method potentially allowing for continuous monitoring of these materials without the need to remove them from their radiation environment. This could greatly speed up the testing process and reduce the preventive replacement of materials that are in fact safe and usable. More

 

  Chemistry

 

Sun 4 Dec 2016. The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has approved the name and symbols for four newly discovered elements: nihonium (Nh), moscovium (Mc), tennessine (Ts), and oganesson (Og), respectively for element 113, 115, 117, and 118. The exploration of new elements continues, and scientists are searching for elements beyond the seventh row of the periodic table. More

 

  Energy

 

Sun 13 Nov 2017. An international team of scientists suggests that the world must ramp up energy production by nuclear power if we are to succeed in warding off the worst effects of greenhouse gas emissions on climate change. The team suggests that beginning in 2020 we could achieve an annual electricity output of 20 TW without needing to develop carbon dioxide trapping and storage technology for the tens of billions of tons of emissions that would otherwise drive global warming to catastrophic levels. Recent research suggests that it should be physically and economically plausible to multiply by a factor of fifty the production of nuclear energy by 2100, leading to a complete elimination of fossil fuels wherein 60% of electricity demand is met through nuclear and the remainder through sustainable technology. More

 

  Nuclear

 

Wed 9 Nov 2016. Scientists propose technique to immobilize radioactive waste for millions of years by keeping it in glass. Researchers have searched ways to immobilize waste, particularly iodine-129, which has a half-life of 15.7 million years and can disperse rapidly in air and water, making it crucial for its safe storage and disposal in underground geological formations. The research may eventually lead to ways to safely dispose highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel, which is currently being stored at commercial nuclear power plants. More

 

نشرة أخبار التقانة الحيوية
نشرة الوقاية الإشعاعية وأمان المصادر المُشعّة
 

 

 

 
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